Accessories for Wooden View Cameras

 

from the time period in which wooden view cameras were made: c.1850-1930

 

Cases
Many cases came with the purchase of a camera - see General Trends - Cases page.  A few were marketed separately as an accessory.  These after-market-type cases are shown here.

Anthony's Brass Bound Canvas Carrying Case, E. & H.T. Anthony & Co., c.1880's-c.1890's

 

Glass Plate Holder Cases
Staple of the dry-plate view camera.  Cut film holders look identical.  When cut film started to be made, its size was standardized to dimensions slightly smaller than the corresponding plate size.  The reason was so that a piece of cut film could be slipped into a metal sleeve ("kit") that was exactly the same size as a glass plate, to allow the use of cut film in glass plate holders.

American Optical Co. Plate Holders, 4x5, c.1883
American Optical Co. Plate Holders, 3x4, c.1885
American Optical Co. Plate Holders, 5x8, c.1885
Blair Camera Co. Plate Holders, 5x8, c.1890
E. & H.T. Anthony & Co. Plate Holders, 8x10, c.1890
The Eastman Co., Plate Holders for the Interchangeable View Camera, 6x8, c. 1890
Eastman Kodak Co. Plate Holders, 4x5, c. 1890
Eastman Kodak Co. Plate Holders, 5x7, c. 1890
John Barnett's Patent Plate Holders and Carrier, c.1890

 

 

Glass Plate Boxes
Once a photograph was taken on a dry plate, it had to be stored somewhere.  Wooden boxes could be had for that purpose.

Samuel Peck & Co., New York - 5x6, c.1850-1860
Otto Loehr, New York - 6x8, c.1884-1904
Scovill Mfg. Co., 5x7, c.1890
Unknown, 6x8, c.1890
Rochester Optical Co., 4x5, c. 1890
Unknown Manufacturer/used by Child's Art Gallery, Michigan, c. 1890

 

 

Plate Holders
Glass plates were used c.1850 - c.1910, when cut film finally had the dimensional stability to approach that of glass plates.  For scientific purposes, where precise measurement of dimension is crucial, glass plates were widely used until quite recently, when they were supplanted by digital detectors.

Wet-Plate Holder, manufacturer unknown, c.1850-1870

 

 

Roll Film Holders
4x5" and larger, made when all cameras were large-format.  Their heyday was 1886-1900.  By 1901, Kodak had introduced the Cartridge Roll Holder, which could be loaded in daylight, a marked improvement over these darkroom-bound versions.  Cartridges were made in sizes up to 5x7".

Eastman-Walker Roll Film Holder Variation 1 - Eastman Dry Plate & Film Co., c.1885-1888
Eastman-Walker Roll Film Holder Variation 2 - Model of 1889 - The Eastman Co., c.1889
Eastman-Walker Roll Film Holder Variation 3 - The Eastman Co., c.1886-1888
Eastman-Walker Roll Film Holder Variation 3.5 - The Eastman Co., c.1888
Eastman-Walker Roll Film Holder Variation 4 - Eastman Kodak Co., c.1888-c.1897
Eastman Cartridge Roll Film Holder - Eastman Kodak Co., c.1901
Eastman Daylight Roll Film Holder - Eastman Kodak Co., c.1905-c.1910's
Blair Camera Co. Roller-Blind Shutter, c. 1888
Blair Camera Co. Hawk-Eye Roll Holder, Variation 1 for the Hawkeye Detective Camera, c. 1891
Blair Camera Co. Hawk-Eye Roll Holder, Variation 2 for the Hawkeye Detective Camera, c. 1898

 

 

Miscellany

Klay's Multiplying Plate-Holder -The Single Lens Multiplying Plate-Holder Company
The Nussbaum Tray - sold by E. & H.T. Anthony & Co., c.1890

Poco Amber Filter - Rochester Optical & Camera Co.,, c. 1899-1903
Premo Ray Screen - Rochester Optical Co., c. 1903-1907
 
Ray Filter - Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., c.1907
Retouching Stand - Unknown Manufacturer, c.1890
Viewfinder, Anthony's Universal Finder - Scovill Mfg. Co., c.1888
Viewfinder, Magic - Scovill Mfg. Co., c.1888-c.1892
Viewfinder,  Unknown Manufacturer, c.1890
Viewfinder, Sure Shot - G. Gennert, c.1895
Viewfinder, Waterbury - Scovill Mfg. Co., c. 1885

 

 


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